The Top 5 Chef Knives

August 24, 2019
Chef knives are long-lasting, high-quality, cut better and are suitable for all kinds of food. You don't have the be a professional chef to enjoy your own.

Whether they’re professional or amateur, knives are one of the most important tools for chefs. Professional or not, if you cook a lot you should have (at least) one of our top-5 chef knives. You won’t regret it!

Which are the best chef knives?

As scissors are for hairdressers or cameras are for photographers, chefs are a key tool for chefs. Thus, choosing a quality knife is crucial.

You don’t have to be a professional chef to consider chef knives though. These days, you have all kinds of quality materials and utensils to choose from without having to spend a fortune.

Before purchasing your knife, make sure it’s the best model for cutting meat, vegetables, fish, chicken and fruit alike. Later on, you can add on to your collection by buying a special knife for a specific food or recipe.

Another item to consider for the future is a pairing, bread or filleting knife. But for starters, we recommend choosing one of these chef knives:

1. Quttin dimple knife

This knife boasts quality, strength, and stability. It has a stainless steel and polyoxymethylene handle, which ensures high resilience and long product life. You can enjoy it in your kitchen for years on end and it’ll never fail to cut.

The handle design– which lifts slightly– allows for the perfect grip and more precision when cutting. The blade is 20 centimeters long and is made with German steel. It’s suitable for both domestic and professional use. While it’s a bit robust, you’ll get the hang of the feel.

Chef knives quttin

2. Wusthof ikon Blackwood

The next knife on our list is a bit wider and measures 9 inches in length. It’s also one of the most popular knives on the market. Aside from being sought-out by professionals, home cooks can also enjoy its amazing benefits.

The Wusthof ikon Blackwood knife has a rounded tip (which is perfect for mincing herbs like parsley). While it’s a bit heavy, you can move quite freely with it. Its German origin is a stamp of quality.

chef knives German

3. Arcos

If you’re looking for a simpler design, the Arcos knife is for you. It cuts through any kind of food and is made of Nitrum stainless steel. The blade measures 17 centimeters in length and the handle 3, which makes it perfect for everyday cooking.

The Arcos knife also features stainless steel rivets to ensure a long product life. Additionally, the blade can cut both hot and cold foods.

Chef knives arcos

4. Moritaka Gyuto

Japanese knives are also a chef favorite, making them a must for our list. The Moritaka Gyuto knife boasts a unique design. It looks like a piece from a centuries-old blacksmith.

This traditional piece features a long blade with a layer of black iron along with a wooden handle that has an adjustable stainless steel piece. It also boasts the perfect tip for removing the sections of food you want to keep out of your recipes.

chef knives moritaka

5. Asai Damascus

The last knife on our list today also hails from Japan and has a similar, yet more modern design. It was created by an expert fishmonger and while the knife was intended more for fish, it can also cut through other foods as well.

This gorgeous knife knife has a wide silver-coated blade (with Japanese inscriptions) that ends in a fine point. The handle is wooden and very comfortable.

chef knives asai

The prices of the knives vary greatly. While some of them are quite expensive, keep in mind that they’ll serve you for life. A good knife is an investment, not a waste of money. From the moment you purchase it, you can enjoy its benefits and perfect cuts forever.

Don’t forget to wash by hand and dry well before putting them away. Additionally, we recommend storing them in their original bag or cover to keep them from getting banged up by your other utensils. Making the effort to take care of them is well worth it!

Henderson, J. C. (2011). Celebrity chefs: Expanding empires. British Food Journal. https://doi.org/10.1108/00070701111131728