All You Need to Know About "Anti-Goals" Decoration

06 July, 2020
Have you heard of the "anti-goals" philosophy? This new way of thinking has now become a new way of decorating, and it could make decision-making a lot easier.

No doubt at some point in your life you’ve imagined your dream home. You might have designed it down to the very last detail and you know exactly how you want to decorate it. However, have you thought about how you wouldn’t decorate your dream home? This is how “anti-goals” decoration works. This post will explain how you can decorate using this philosophy. 

Anti what?

A living room with anti goals decoration.

It was entrepreneur Andrew Wilkinson, founder of MetaLab, who first developed the “anti-goals” philosophy. Wilkinson was inspired by something Charlie Munger, one of the world’s most important investors, once said, “All I want to know is where I’m going to die, so I’ll never go there.” 

Charlie Munger was very certain about his approach to investments. He believes that “Problems frequently get easier if you turn them around in reverse.” In other words, it’s often easier to think about what you don’t want than what you do.

Wilkinson then decided to make a list of all the things that made his working life more difficult and solve these challenges one by one. His main goal was to lead a happier life. 

Long meetings, packed calendars, having to be in the office… all these aspects of Wilkinson’s life made him feel far from happy, far from the successful entrepreneur he was supposed to be.

He therefore decided not to schedule meetings in person if they could be done another way. He chose not to spend time around people he didn’t like, to work from a place that inspired him, whether that’s a café or his own home, and to dress how he wanted.

“Anti-goals” decoration – a home without unrealistic expectations

Whether you believe in it or not, more and more people are following the anti-goals trend. This philosophy allows us to relax, stop building up false expectations, and accept that not everything needs to be perfect.

When it comes to your home decor, maybe you dream of having an attic, as well as a swimming pool and an industrial-style loft, at the same time. But, you’re not sure how to give life to and bring together all these different ideas.

We’ve already seen that the anti-goals philosophy works well in a work environment, but you can also apply this approach to decorating your home. Why not take a moment to consider what bothers you about your home, what you don’t want to have, and you’ll see how easy interior decor can be.

You could start by writing the famous list that Wilkinson suggests writing. This will make it easier for you to think of solutions and finally have the house of your dreams. Let’s get started!

“Anti-goals” decoration – finding the solution

I don’t like dark houses

Light-colored furniture.

If this is one of your “anti-goals”, try to avoid houses with small windows that look onto interior courtyards, or with lots of rooms on ground level. Your ideal home will undoubtedly be one with lots of windows that let in floods of light.

However, if you already have a darker home and you’re not currently able to move, there are still solutions. For example, it’s best to avoid thick curtains and dark furniture. You could also choose lighter-colored floors, or, if that’s not an option, you could lay a rug that brings a sense of brightness to your home. Finally, you could add accessories in pastel colors that bring joy to every space.

I don’t like houses with lots of doors or hallways

A house with dark corridors.

If you’re the type of person that doesn’t like a home with lots of doors or hallways, then undoubtedly your perfect home will be a loft. But don’t worry if you’re currently living in a small and sprawling apartment. You could always knock down a wall, if possible.

However, other simpler solutions could make your home seem bigger, such as an open-plan kitchen with a bar or even a kitchen-diner.

I hate not being able to find clothes in my closet

An image representing a home with anti goals decoration.

Mornings can seem chaotic when you’re trying to find that favorite item of clothing, but you can’t find it in any nook or cranny. The solution to this might seem obvious; although you might love the idea of a dressing room, simply installing better lighting in your closet will be more than enough to make your mornings feel more organized.

These are just a couple of examples of how you can use the “anti-goals” philosophy to decorate your home. Why not sit down and draw up a list of the things that annoy you about your home, room by room. Then, it’ll be much easier to find the solutions that will meet your needs and your goals. Feel free to tell us how you get on – we’d love to hear about your experience.